That time Greeks invaded Africa: Carthage’s struggle against Agathocles (311 – 306 BC)

In June 310 BC, a fleet under the command of Agathocles, the tyrant of Syracuse, set sail to Africa, in order to attack Carthage. After six days of sailing, once encountering and driving away a carthaginian fleet, Agathocles landed somewhere near Cape Bon (in modern day Tunesia). He ordered his ships to be burned, so …

The Helots of Ancient Sparta?

When you think of Sparta, an image will most likely form of hoplites formed in line or on march. Men in gleaming armour, surly eyes and possibly the odd six pack. Spartan society attracted a lot of interest both in the time of the ancient Greeks and later, its mystique cultivated by a lack of …

Federal States: The Rise and Fall of the Arkadian Koinon

Today, federal states are a popular form of government throughout the world. Some examples include the European Union or countries like Belgium, Canada, German and the United States. Within a federal state, different governments (federal and regional/local) interact with one another to ensure an optimal working of the federation. However, it is not always easy …

Hellenistic Babylon and Seleucid Imperial Ideology

The academic year has started again, so it is time for another guest post. This time Derek from the Hellenistic Age Podcast delves deeper into the connections of the ancient city of Babylon with the Seleucid Dynasty. How did the Seleucid rulers navigate the complexities of Babylonian traditions and local customs? What lessons can we …

The Nike of Samothrace

Hellenistic sculptures is perhaps the most famous of the sculptures of the Hellenistic period. Now found at the Louvre, it has been speaking to visitor’s imagination for several centuries now. But where does it come from?   The drama of Nike Where to begin? It has been on prominent display in the Louvre since 1884 and …

Dionysos: the controversial Athenian Deity

Today’s article by guest blogger Alexis Prescott is all about one of the most interesting of the Greek gods: Dionysos. There is no doubt that he was a popular and well-loved deity from the Greek pantheon. Not least due to the Athenian festival held in his honour – the City Dionysia – in which the …

Hellenistic cities IV: Pergamon

Today we continue with a new part of our series on Hellenistic cities: Pergamon.  This was an ancient city located in modern-day Turkey, which played a significant role in the political and cultural landscape of the Hellenistic period. The city’s strategic location, powerful rulers, and impressive monuments made it a major player in the Hellenistic …

The Greek Anthology of Hellenistic Poetry

Have you ever wondered how we still have poems or histories or stories written thousands of years ago? Were there publishers that long ago? Were there bookstores? How did these works survive? In an earlier blog post, we read a poem by Anyte, a Hellenistic poet writing 2,300 years ago. How is it we have …

The Sogdian Revolt against Alexander the Great

As we near the end of the year, we continue our deep dive on different aspects of Alexander the Great’s life. Today’s guest post by Joshua Zapf looks at the troubles Alexander faced during his campaigns in Central Asia, a topic often overlooked public history. Alexander the Great’s military campaign is generally known for its …

Travels in Greece II: the Southeast of the Peloponnese

In the first part of this series, we have already been introduced to the northern part of the Peloponnese, the peninsula in the south of mainland Greece. Today we continue our journey along the mountains of Arcadia to the wild nature of the Mani region. Starting we do so in a region that is often …